Minneapolis supports Urban Street Design Guide

The City of Minneapolis is supporting a new set of guidelines to help planners design 21st century urban city streets. The Urban Street Design Guide, developed by the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), is another resource the City can use to help make Minneapolis streets safer, more livable, and more economically vibrant. Minneapolis, a NATCO member, is jointly supporting the guide along with some key local partners: The Minnesota Department of Transportation, Hennepin County and the City of Saint Paul.

The Urban Street Design Guide an innovative collection of practices and expertise to help cities across the country address challenges and unprecedented demands associated with planning streets in today’s unique urban environment. The guide will complement the City of Minneapolis’ own design guidelines to help City engineers plan modern urban city streets.

“The City has put a lot of focus on improving street design, specifically through the adoption of our own design guidelines in 2008 as part of Access Minneapolis,” says Steve Kotke, the director of Minneapolis Public Works. “The NACTO Urban Street Design Guide complements our past efforts and generates more ideas and innovation. We’ve already begun using the guide to evolve and improve our streets, making them better for everyone to use.”

NATCO developed the guidelines as a transformative vision for urban city street design that considers all modes of travel, including motor vehicles, bicycles, transit and pedestrian. The guide is a collection of best practices for designing all sorts of streets and intersections based on variety of circumstances, conditions, and contexts. It covers street and intersection design principles and elements, such as curb extensions, speed bumps, crosswalks and transit stations. Also includes interim design strategies for things like temporary street closures, pilot to permanent, parklets and interim public plazas.

The Urban Street Design Guide is presented in an engaging, visual context in both online and print versions at  nacto.org/usdg.

Published Apr 30, 2014