Water Treatment & Distribution Services 

350 S. 5th St. Room 203
Minneapolis, MN 55415

612-673-2418

Frequently Asked Questions

Drinking Water Quality FAQ

Why does my drinking water look red, yellow, or brown?

 Although its appearance is not pleasing, the water does not pose a health risk and is safe to drink. There are, however, a couple things to avoid until the water clears:

Do not use hot water because sediment will collect in the hot water tank.

Do not do laundry because the iron can stain clothing.

The water should clear within a few hours. Check the water every 30 or 60 minutes by running the cold water tap located in the lowest point in your home for 2-3 minutes. Once it runs clear, flush the pipes in your home by running all cold water taps for a few minutes.

If the problem persists, a system hydrant may need to be flushed. Please call 311. 

Why does my drinking water look cloudy or milky?

  Cloudy or milky-looking water is most likely caused by tiny air bubbles. This typically happens when the water changes temperature and is often observed in the fall and spring. 

 There are two common reasons:

Water can absorb more air at higher water pressure. Because the water in the distribution system and your home’s pipes are pressurized, when the water is poured into a drinking glass the air leaves the water in the form of bubbles.

Water releases air bubbles when it is warmed. As water makes its way from a cold reservoir to your tap, it warms up. Cold water holds more air than warm water, so once the water leaves the tap some of the air is no longer soluble and leaves the water in the form of bubbles. 

Fill a glass and let it sit for a few minutes. If the bubbles rise to the top and the cloudiness disappears, then the issue was just caused by some air bubbles.

If the water does not clear after a few minutes, please call 311. 

Why does my water smell or taste bad?

 Your water shouldn't have an discernible taste or odor.

An odor from your tap is commonly caused by unsanitary sink plumbing, garbage disposal, or nozzle screen on the sink spout, and not by the water itself. If you notice a taste or odor, first check the other taps in your house. The s-shaped pipe under your sink is especially prone to collecting debris. 

Fill a glass halfway with tap water and smell the water in a separate room or try running the faucet with the drain closed. If the odor is no longer present, the source of the problem is likely the plumbing beneath your sink.

If the problem is not from the plumbing or if it persists longer than one day, contact 311. You may be asked the following questions: 

Is the taste or odor occurring at all faucets?

When was the taste or odor first detected?

Is the taste or odor in the hot or cold water, or both? 

How would you describe the taste or odor (e.g. earthy, musty, grassy)?

Do neighbors have the same problem?

Where can I find more information?

Contact us! For more information or to report an issue please call 311 (612-673-3000). TTY/TDD customers dial 612-673-2157. 

You can also report an issue through our online forms: Report a Water Issue Form

Common Water Quality Concerns (PDF Printer Friendly) 

Lead

There has been a lot of news lately about lead in Flint, Michigan’s, drinking water. Minneapolis tap water customers can rest assured that their drinking water is safe. The water treatment plant’s staff continuously samples, analyzes and documents the quality of Minneapolis’s water in its raw state and throughout the distribution system. Lead levels in the City of Minneapolis water supply have been in strict compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Minnesota Department of Health regulations since monitoring requirements began in 1991. The state Department of Health requires extensive testing for lead and copper in the City’s drinking water every three years. These tests were most recently conducted in 2015, and every one of the tests passed.

Lead in drinking water is usually from lead that has leeched from homeowners’ plumbing such as private service pipes, lead-based solder and components such as brass fixtures. This is a preventable problem. In fact, in the early 1990s, the Minnesota Department of Health approved the City’s Optimum Corrosion Control Program, which let Minneapolis water professionals figure out the best water chemistry strategies to prevent corrosion in our water system. As a result of that program, Minneapolis controls the pH of water so it’s noncorrosive and also adds a corrosion inhibitor called ortho polyphosphate. As a result, Minneapolis’ water is designed to form a thin scale inside pipes and fixtures to act as a barrier between the metal and the water we drink.

For more about how the City makes sure its drinking water is safe, please contact George Kraynick at 612-661-4923 or George.Kraynick@minneapolismn.gov.

Mpls Drinking Water - Lead Fact Sheet (PDF Printer Friendly)

Hmong - Mpls Drinking Water: Lead Fact Sheet (PDF Printer Friendly)

Somali - Mpls Drinking Water: Lead Fact Sheet (PDF Printer Friendly)

Spanish - Mpls Drinking Water: Lead Fact Sheet (PDF Printer Friendly

Fluoride

Minneapolis Water is among the 620 public water supplies in Minnesota that are required by law to add a small amount of fluoride to their water. Fluoride is a mineral that helps prevent tooth decay. Learn more about fluoride and Minneapolis Water fluoridation here.

Mpls Drinking Water - Fluoride Fact Sheet (PDF Printer Friendly)

Hmong - Mpls Drinking Water - Fluoride Fact Sheet (PDF Printer Friendly)

Somali - Mpls Drinking Water - Fluoride Fact Sheet (PDF Printer Friendly)

Spanish - Mpls Drinking Water - Fluoride Fact Sheet (PDF Printer Friendly)

Frozen Water Service Lines

Minneapolis takes care of over 1,000 miles of underground water mains throughout the city. When homes or businesses connect to the water mains, the owners of those properties have the responsibility of maintaining their water service lines. When underground water lines freeze during extremely cold winters, the property owners must contact and pay a contractor to thaw out the line.

Why do water service lines freeze?

Water service lines freeze when excessively cold winters cause the depth of the frost to reach the service line.

Who is responsible for water service lines?

In the City of Minneapolis, the property owner owns the water service line from the water main to the meter. It’s the property owner’s responsibility to maintain this line, including the curb valve, in good working order.

WTDS - Pipelines

How do I know if my service line is frozen?

If there is no water anywhere in your house, and your supply line and master shut off valves are open, you may have a frozen service line. 

Contact the City of Minneapolis Water Treatment and Distribution Services Division at 612-673-5600 and an inspector can be sent to confirm whether your line is frozen.

My service line is frozen. What should I do?

If your service line is frozen, you will need to call a qualified contractor who specializes in thawing frozen services.  You can call the City of Minneapolis Water Treatment and Distribution Services Division at 612-673-5600 or Minneapolis 311 for information on contractors who do this type of work.  Once your service has been thawed, we recommend that you follow the guidelines below regarding prevention to avoid a recurrence.

Is there a way to prevent my service line from freezing?

Most service lines are buried deep enough to not freeze in the winter. If you have not experienced frozen service lines in the past, it’s unlikely it will do so now. There is no certainty to know which service lines will freeze from those that will not.  One method to prevent your service line from freezing  is by keeping a faucet in the lowest level of your home running at a trickle (a pencil-width stream is all you need) of cold water until the ground thaws.  If you choose this option, make sure your drain is free of debris to prevent overflowing or flooding. Also, place a highly visible note on the faucet reminding family members to not turn the water off.  Turning the water off, for even a few minutes, could cause a recently frozen line to refreeze.

Do not turn off the faucet the moment outside temperatures rise above freezing.  The ground takes longer to thaw, so wait until there’s a thorough thawing before shutting it off. This will take longer than a just few days of warm weather.

If I choose to run my water to prevent my line from freezing, who pays for the extra water and sewer charges?

You are responsible for the current water and sewer charges if you choose to run your water continuously as insurance against your service line freezing or refreezing. This will increase your monthly bill by approximately $100 per month, which is likely far less than the cost of repairing a frozen service line.

If you are a residential customer, contact the City of Minneapolis Utility Billing Office at 612-673-1114 to request a credit on your sewer base charges so your summer sewer rates will not be affected.

How can I correct this problem permanently?

If you have a service line that freezes frequently, you may want to consider hiring a qualified contractor to lower your service line to a depth that cannot be penetrated by frost. 

If you have any questions regarding this information, please call the City of Minneapolis Public Works Water Treatment and Distribution Services Division at 612-673-5600. 

Cleaning & Lining Water Main

Why clean and line water mains?

Older water mains in town (about 750 of the 1,000 miles of water main) are made of unlined cast iron. Over the years, these pipes get mineral deposits that, while safe, can decrease water volume in the pipe and discolor water for customers.

To fix this, crews scrape off the mineral buildup in these mains. Also, added is cement lining to prevent the cast iron water main from future mineral build up. This work extends 50 years of life to the water mains and maintains high level of water quality for everyone. Since the mid-1960s, the City has installed ductile iron that comes with a factory-installed cement lining for any new water main installations.

Schedule and Process Steps

1. Opening the Water Mains

City of Minneapolis work crews will excavate the access holes and cut out sections of water main every 600 to 750 feet in the project area. The holes must be excavated up to a few weeks in advance to ensure that the cleaning and lining contractor can work continuously once they arrive on site. A trench shield will be installed around each access point.

2. Cleaning & Lining

Crews will clean each water main and install the protective coating.

3. Testing the Water & Closing the Holes

After all the lining is complete, the City will test the water in the mains. When the water meets all Federal requirements, City crews will close all of the holes in the streets. At various stages of the project, it may appear as if there is little activity taking place and/or no workers are visible at the project site. This simply means that the crews are working at different locations in the City.

Temporary Water Supply

Crews need to empty the water mains before any cleaning and lining can occur. As a result, temporary service will be provided by installing plastic pipes along the curb with connections via potable water hoses to the exterior faucet of each building that is serviced from the water main. Water service should not be interrupted during this project. While the temporary line is in use water will not run through the water meter. Therefore, the City of Minneapolis will bill your property for estimated water usage based on your previous year’s usage.

The connector installed on your outside faucet will allow you to connect a garden hose. The enclosed diagram outlines the steps to make this connection. Please review the diagram carefully and keep as a reference until the project is complete in your area.

If a building’s “stop valve” (water service shut off located near the curb) does not work, a City of Minneapolis Public Works employee will temporarily remove the building’s water meter to prevent backflow of domestic water into the water main. If it is necessary to access your building for this reason or anytime during this project, you will be contacted to schedule an appointment. Please note that City employees carry a City of Minneapolis identification badge.

Temporary Water Supply Diagram 

Water Billing

Water service should not be interrupted during this project. While the temporary line is in use water will not run through the water meter. Therefore, the City of Minneapolis will bill your property for estimated water usage based on your previous year’s usage.

Traffic

Most of the access holes will be located at intersections. Therefore, parking and driving lanes may be restricted. The City will do everything it can to keep the traffic moving.

Safety

Many safety hazards are present in a construction work area. Please remind children not to play in, around the construction sites, or on the piles of dirt in the street. Please also remember to drive slowly and cautiously in the affected areas. 

If you have any questions about this project, please call the City of Minneapolis, Public Works Water Treatment and Distribution Services Division at (612) 673-5600.

Structural Lining Water Main

The purpose of installing a structural liner, a cured in place pipe liner designed for water distribution systems, formed from a resin-saturated tube cured with heat. The liner increases flow capacity, adds corrosion resistance, and provides additional service life by 50 years. The costs associated with this project will not be assessed to your property.

Schedule and Process Steps

1. Opening the Water Mains

City of Minneapolis work crews will excavate the access holes and cut out sections of water main every 600 to 750 feet in the project area. The holes must be excavated up to a few weeks in advance to ensure that the structural lining contractor can work continuously once they arrive on site. A trench shield will be installed around each access point.

2. Cleaning & Lining

Crews will clean each water main and install the liner.

3. Testing the Water & Closing the Holes

After all the lining is complete, the City will test the water in the mains. When the water meets all Federal requirements, City crews will close all of the holes in the streets. At various stages of the project, it may appear as if there is little activity taking place and/or no workers are visible at the project site. This simply means that the crews are working at different locations in the City.

Temporary Water Supply

In order for the work to be completed, the water main must be free from backflow of domestic water into the water main. As a result, it will be necessary to enter each building being serviced from the water main to disconnect the water meter and later to reenter to reinstall it. You will be contacted to schedule an appointment. Please note that City employees carry a City of Minneapolis identification badge. Temporary water service will be provided by installing plastic pipes along the curb with connections via potable water hoses to the exterior faucet of most buildings serviced by the water main. City of Minneapolis plumbers will -evaluate each commercial property for the temporary water connection. Water service should not be interrupted during this project. While the water meter is disconnected, the City of Minneapolis will bill your property for estimated water usage based on your previous year’s usage.

The connector installed on your outside faucet will allow you to connect a garden hose. The diagram outlines the steps to make this connection. Please review the diagram carefully and keep as a reference until the project is complete in your area.

Temporary Water Supply Diagram

 

Water Billing

Water service should not be interrupted during this project. While the temporary line is in use water will not run through the water meter. Therefore, the City of Minneapolis will bill your property for estimated water usage based on your previous year’s usage.

Traffic

Most of the access holes will be located at intersections. Therefore, parking and driving lanes may be restricted. The City will do everything it can to keep the traffic moving.

Safety

Many safety hazards are present in a construction work area. Please remind children not to play in, around the construction sites, or on the piles of dirt in the street. Please also remember to drive slowly and cautiously in the affected areas. If you have any questions about this project, please call the City of Minneapolis, Public Works Water Treatment and Distribution Services Division at (612) 673-5600.

Hydrant Flushing

The City flushes the water hydrants to help maintain good water quality and to verify the hydrants are in working order. The flushing process may stir up small amounts of iron and manganese deposits in the water mains, causing your water to discolor and turn a shade of brown. Unfortunately, it is not possible to determine in advance whether or not this discoloration will occur. Discolored water is safe for drinking. However, it may damage laundry. Therefore, customers are cautioned against doing laundry, especially white clothing, while City crews are in the area.

Please warn children to keep a safe distance from the work area while City crews are flushing the hydrants.

Utility Billing 

Billing Help and Information

Minneapolis Utility Billing provides billing services for Minneapolis residents for their water, sewer, stormwater, solid waste and recycling services. For billing help and information, please go to Utility Billing.

Utility Bill Emergency Assistance

Hennepin County Human Service department offers help and support to the City of Minneapolis residents by providing short-term aid to ease financial hardships, covered services include utility bills. 

For information, call the Hennepin County Emergency Assistance team at 612-569-1900 or go to Hennepin Emergency Programs

Money Saving Tips

Remember that water is a valuable resource that shouldn't be wasted. Your water is clean, safe and convenient but you have to pay for its treatment and the system to deliver it to you. By conserving water in your home, you also save energy needed to heat it or run appliances.

Bathrooms

  • Two thirds of the water used in an average home is used in the bathroom, and a lot of it goes into the sewer. From 2-7 gallons of water are used every time a toilet is flushed. Do not use the toilet to flush items that can go in a wastebasket or garbage can.
  • Be aware of toilet leaks. See information about leaks.
  • You may have been advised to take showers rather than baths to conserve water. If you take a long shower, however, you may use more water than if you took a bath. Long, hot showers not only waste water but also energy to heat the water. Consider using reduced-flow devices for showerheads.
  • Don't leave the water running while you shave or brush your teeth. You are just running clean water down the drain.

Kitchens

  • Be sure the dishwasher is fully loaded before running it. There is no need to rinse dishes before putting them in the dishwasher.
  • If you wash dishes by hand, do not let the water run while washing or rinsing. Don't let the water run while cleaning vegetables or other foods, either. Use a large pan or dish for rinsing.
  • Store drinking water in the refrigerator rather than letting it run until it's cold.

Laundry

  • Be sure to have full loads, or use the automatic controls for smaller loads. Use cold water for rinsing.

Outdoors

  • Don't water on a fixed schedule or if rain is forecast -- water grass or plants only if they show signs of needing it. Water during the coolest part of the day to avoid excess evaporation and let the water sink in slowly. Water applied too fast runs off into storm sewers.
  • When washing the car, use a bucket of water for washing and run the hose only for rinsing.

Plumbing

  • Install shutoff valves for appliances and fixtures in case a pipe blows out. Most importantly, check for a main shutoff valve that turns off water to the whole house, and make sure that it works.

Leak Detection

How can I tell if I have any water leaks?

Newer types of water meters have a leak indicator on the face of the dial. It is a triangular or diamond-shaped indicator that revolves 354 times for every gallon of water that passes through the meter. Note: You may see what looks like water on the face of the dial. It is oil that prevents corrosion and increases the life of the dial mechanism. It does not enter the water supply and does not affect the quality of the water delivered to the customer.

To check for leaks, look at the indicator when no one is drawing water. It should not be moving. If it is moving, check every plumbing fixture at the property, i.e., toilet, sink, outside sprinkler, washer, etc. Shut off the valves that supply each fixture, one by one, and check the indicator after each shutoff. When closing a valve stops the indicator from moving, or slows its movement, you have found the location of a leak. There may be more than one leak!

Be sure to check toilets at the property! Toilet leaks are the most common and are hard to see or hear. Put food coloring or laundry bluing in the toilet tank and wait 10 minutes. Do not flush the toilet during this time. If the coloring appears in the toilet bowl, there is a toilet leak. Also, if you hear the toilet refilling and no one has used it, there is a leak. A major toilet leak can waste 800 cubic feet of water a day -- which would cost over $27.00 for water and over $27.00 for sewer each day. That adds up to over $1,600.00 a month!

Look for leaky faucets, too. A fast drip from a faucet wastes about 265 gallons a day -- which would cost about $1.20 for water and $1.20 for sewer per day. That's almost $75 a month! Repair leaky faucets and toilets promptly -- do it yourself or call a plumber because these leaks cost money. Once the leak is repaired, check the leak indicator again and make sure all leaks are repaired.

 

Last updated Dec 12, 2017

QUICK LINKS

Home

Contact us

Email updates

Find a service

About this site

For employees

Accessibility:
For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats, contact 311.
People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000.
TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-637-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500. 

CONNECT

311 call center

TTY relay service

 

facebook25x25 twitter25x25 youtube25x25 Minneapolis311icon logo tv 14 footer icon image linkedin_32x32




mpls-logo-white120